A Guide To Regular Health Checks for Your Dog

As we continue on our journey toward canine wellness our next path takes us to the learning about health checks for our dogs.  An overall body exam only takes a few minutes and makes sure that everything operates the way it should. If you find any unexpected lumps, bumps, cuts, sore spots, etc. then you can to make an appointment with your dog’s veterinarian.

My wish, is that every dog has a health check at least once a month. Even though my dogs are on flea and tick preventative I do a daily body exam to make sure that ticks didn’t catch a ride on them. It is important to remove a tick as soon as possible to reduce the risk of disease transmission. My dog Abby (RIP) had Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever and I never even knew she had been bitten by a tick.

Performing regular health checks help you know your dog’s overall wellness and helps your dog learn to enjoy the body exam – even from your veterinarian. Imagine that – a less stressful veterinary visit for your dog!

Linda Michaels, M.A. reminds us in the Hierachy of Dog NeedsTM that it is our responsibility to take care of more than our dog’s biological needs – we are responsible for their wellness too. Performing an overall body exam and health check can help ensure your dog’s wellness. So let’s go that extra step and look out for our dog’s overall well-being.

There are a couple of ground rules when you do a health check on your dog. First off, they are for non-emergency routine care. The information you gather in no way replaces a visit to your veterinarian and your dog should continue his regularly scheduled veterinary appointments.

Throughout the process observe your dog. If at any point your dog shows signs of discomfort – stop what you are doing. Make a note of what you did – were you leaning over him or was your touch too hard? Maybe there is an injury or maybe you startled your dog. Pay attention because an injury may require medical attention but a startle response does not. If you determine your dog is healthy yet is reluctant to be handled then please contact a trainer or behavior consultant in your area for assistance. Don’t force your dog to be touched in an area or in a way that makes him uncomfortable.

Approach – your dog from the side. If you approach directly from the front your dog may take that as an aggressive approach. When you approach from the side – or present your body sideways, you are considered less threatening. Extra tip – wait a moment for your dog to come to you. Giving your dog a moment to decide that he wants to participate make all the difference in the world.

Position – you should not restrict or block your dog’s movement. If you restrict his movement he may feel trapped and become reactive or aggressive. There is a difference between containment and restraint. You can contain your dog in a small area without restraint. When you do this your dog has some choice and is more likely to accept being touched even in sensitive places.

Distance – don’t crowd or lean over your dog. Most dogs have an interesting response when you lean over them, especially near their head, most of the time they will jump up and that can cause you to be bumped. The times when this doesn’t happen is if  the dog has been trained not to jump. Have you noticed that if you crowd your dog she may do things like spin, jump up, give you a kiss, and many other behaviors; pay attention to see what your dog does to increase space. Other dogs don’t do what we consider “friendly” warnings instead they go straight to growl and bite. Be kind and respect your dog’s need for space. Don’t wait for her to growl or bite before you listen to what she is telling you.

Duration – your movements should be efficient and fluid/smooth. If you hesitate and are jerky when you work with your dog then he will not be comfortable. If you are consistently hesitant or jerky then your dog may learn to be fearful of the health checks. If you are not confident about this exercise please practice on a stuffed dog first. Your dog will thank you.

Pressure how you touch matters. Too light of a touch tickles and too hard of a touch hurts. I call this the Goldilocks effect – you want your touch to be “just right.” Experiment to find the right amount of pressure your dog likes. Remember that what feels good on the shoulder may not feel good on the hindquarters. Another handy tip – what feels good after a nap may not be the same as what feels good before or after a workout.

Safety – ALWAYS practice safe handling and have an escape route for yourself.

Here are two pages of illustrations to guide you through the health check/overall body exam process.

My next posts will go into more detail about the different sections and the body language in each section. Please feel free to comment/ask question

For a downloadable file click here: HealthChecks-Dog-01

For a downloadable file click here: HealthChecks-Dog-02

References:
The Hierachy of Dog NeedsTM Linda Michaels, M.A

Hierarchy of Dog Needs

Forbidding Forecast For Lyme Disease In The Northeast, March 6, 2017 5:00 AM ET Heard on Morning Edition http://www.npr.org/sections/goatsandsoda/2017/03/06/518219485/forbidding-forecast-for-lyme-disease-in-the-northeast

How to safely remove a tick http://www.petmd.com/dog/parasites/how-to-remove-a-tick-from-dog-cat

Acknowledgements:
The Guide to Health Check  illustrations were made possible by a grant from the Josiah Charles Trent Memorial Foundation Endowment Fund.

Diane Lewis of Diane Lewis Photography and Lili Chin of DoggieDrawings.net who illustrated them. The illustrations would not be here without these two amazing women! Both are dedicated to improving the lives of animals and the lives of dogs.

Understanding Your Dog… Dog’s Outer Appearance

My recent posts have focused on ways we communicate with dogs. Let’s continue that exploration by looking at how we identify the areas on a dog’s body. You might think this is not a big deal because everyone knows eyes, ears, mouth, tail… but where is the stop or the croup? Are they near each other? If someone said their dog is biting her hock would you know what that means? I’ve never heard anyone say, that, but it is possible… dog’s do strange things.

When we identify our dog’s body parts it is important to be consistent with terminology. If we aren’t consistent the message can be lost. The attached poster provides names of the dog’s outer appearance.  It doesn’t name the obvious – like “ear” but you know those parts. I hope you find it helpful as we continue on our journey to understand our canine friends.

References
Hastings PW, Wendy E; Rouse, Erin Structure in Action: The Makings of a Durable Dog Dogfolk Enterprises; First edition (January 14, 2011); 2011.
King HG. What’s Your Angle: Understanding Angulation and Structure for the Performance Dog CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform; 2012.

Human Animal Interactions – Illustrated

In honor of Valentine’s Day, a day dedicated to those we love, I would like to share an illustration about Human Animal Interactions. Every day I am in awe of the way dogs inspire us to be better humans. I have no words to fully express all the feelings that dogs inspire, but am fortunate to have created an illustration (with a lot of help) that captures how much we love our dogs – even dogs we may have just met. My hope is that some day we will be able to love as freely and show joy with the same abandon as our dogs do. Until then, I will continue to try and follow my dog’s model of love and friendship. The illustration below is a summary of the my research. The illustrations come from a variety of photographs and is a reminder of all the wonderful ways that dogs enhance our lives.

tirrell_hai_hab

Acknowledgements:
Thank you to Lili Chin for all the fabulous work she does!
Funding for this illustration was made possible by the Josiah Charles Memorial Foundation Endowment Fund

A look behind the illustrations

Ever wonder how an infographic or poster is created? Mine start with a lot of photos, an excel spreadsheet, and power point. The spreadsheet is designed using data from several research papers on the topic of the poster (my research is usually canine body language). Once the spreadsheet is running analysis can begin on the the photos. Finally the selection process begins for the photos that will make it into the power point slides. The photos in power point are used to create the illustrations. Even if a photo makes into PPT, they may not be illustrated. Sometimes photos are in PPT to help the illustrator understand the context which is essential for a well done illustration.

Please understand that I view the creation of illustrations as a journey. Like any journey, there are many people who have helped me along the way. First, these illustrations would not have been possible without the support (and pushing) of a couple of friends who convinced me to apply for funding for this project. These illustrations were made possible by a grant from the Josiah Charles Trent Memorial Foundation Endowment Fund.

Special thanks to both Diane Lewis of Diane Lewis Photography and Lili Chin of DoggieDrawings.net who illustrated them. The illustrations would not be here without these two amazing women! Both are dedicated to improving the lives of animals and most especially the lives of dogs. I’m lucky to have worked with them through this project.

How many photos does it take to create an illustration? I can’t say for sure. There were 1,000 professional photos and more than 1,000 amateur photos reviewed to create the illustrations that will be posted over the coming months. It takes a lot of images to create a pattern.

In order to analyze the photos an Online Canine Body Language Collaborators Group was formed. I can’t say enough wonderful things about this group – they tirelessly answered questions and reviewed materials with me. These collaborators are amazing and I think we all learned a lot going through the photos and illustrations.

I learned a lot doing this project. Not just about my own dogs, but about our relationship with animals. The most important message that I can share is that everything we do needs to strengthen the human animal bond and that the bond is a mutually beneficial and dynamic relationship. For more information on the human animal bond please visit the American Veterinary Medical Association.

When the work we are doing with our dogs stops being mutually beneficial we need to evaluate the situation and change it in some way. Our dogs give us their trust and it is our responsibility to keep them safe and share the joy of life and love every day!

If you liked this post here are a few others that you may find interesting:
Dog Signals and Social Cues: what is your dog telling you

Do You See What I See?

Charlie’s Facial Expressions and Unimaginable Joy

Dog Expressions: A walk through the park

 

Do You See What I See?

Admit it – it’s fun watching our dogs because so often they are joyful. There is a big difference between watching our dogs and observing them. Let’s look at what it means to observe a dog.

Often when we look at dogs we see their love, joy and devotion. However, when we observe dogs we need to be to objective and consistent in what we see. If we are do this task well it can help us understand what our dog experiences as she faces each day.

Everyone's attention is on Louise while they wait for her to throw the dummy. Dogs are Rixa, Galley, Ryder, Jade
Everyone’s attention is on the handler, Louise, while they wait for her to throw the dummy. The dogs are (left to right) Jade, Ryder, Galley, and Rixa

Do you see what I see? It is easy to say that the dogs in this photo are happy and focused on the handler. But what does that tell us about each dog? It is more informative when we slow things down and take photos one frame at a time. You may find it helpful to know the dogs in the photos:

  • Jade (black and white Portuguese Water Dog)
  • Ryder (black Portuguese Water Dog)
  • Galley (black Portuguese Water Dog – white socks on front paws )
  • Rixa (gray Portuguese Water Dog) and
  • Charlie (beagle – blind, no eyes) appears in later photos

Background:  We were playing retrieving games in the yard. The dogs would return to Louise and she would toss the dummy for them. They would all come, sit, and look at Louise. Once they were focused on her she would throw the dummy and the dogs had to wait until they were released from the “wait” to get the dummy after it was thrown. Galley and Jade took off to play right after the photo above was taken which isn’t surprising since they are the youngest dogs in the group. Rixa and Ryder are waiting for Louise to give them their next cue. Meanwhile Charlie is exploring the yard. Rixa and Ryder were focused on Louise when “out of the blue” Rixa lost her focus. The photos make it clear why this happened. When Rixa lost her focus it happened very quickly and it didn’t seem like a big deal. Looking at the photos it is obvious that there was a reason for Rixa to be distracted.
It is helpful to know:

  • Ryder is very stoic and when given a cue he does it and doesn’t usually move from that position
  • Rixa is older and deaf.
Everyone's attention is on Louise while they wait for her to throw the dummy. Dogs are Rixa, Galley, Ryder, Jade
Everyone’s attention is on Louise while they wait for her to throw the dummy. Dogs are Rixa, Galley, Ryder, Jade
  • Jade: head up, ears alert, eyes round and focused on Louise (handler), mouth open panting, tongue straight out, sitting straight, tail not visible in photo
  • Ryder: head up, ears alert, eyes round and focused on Louise (handler), mouth closed, tongue inside, sitting straight,tail straight behind;
  • Galley: head up, ears alert, eyes round and focused on Louise (handler), mouth open panting, tongue out to her left, sitting straight, tail straight behind;
  •  Rixa: head up, ears alert, eyes round and focused on Louise (handler), mouth closed, tongue inside,sitting straight, tail not visible in photo
Rixa and Ryder, focus on Charlie, not Louise
Rixa and Ryder, focus on Charlie, not Louise

Galley and Jade have run off to play. Charlie is wandering around and is coming toward Ryder and Rixa. At this point both Rixa and Ryder are still focused on Louise, but notice that Charlie is aware of the two dogs and his body language indicates he is concerned.

  • Rixa and Ryder are focused on Louise
  • Charlie is about 6 feet away
  • Charlie furrowed brow, ears are soft/floppy, mouth is panting – open with tongue out; body position is a cower (neck and back are level); tail down but not tucked.
Rixa and Ryder, focus on Charlie, not Louise
Rixa and Ryder, focus on Charlie, not Louise

As Charlie approaches Rixa moves her head away from Louise and toward Charlie. Ryder has not moved.

  • Charlie is about 4 feet away
  • Rixa moves her head to her left – the direction Charlie is approaching
  • Ryder does not move
  • Charlie, he is panting and has a furrowed brow. His cower deepens – his head and neck are lower than his back (previous picture they were level with his back), his tail appears to be tucked.
Rixa and Ryder, focus on Charlie, not Louise
Rixa and Ryder, focus on Charlie, not Louise
  • Charlie is almost behind Ryder.
  • Ryder moves his head to his left (the direction that Charlie approached)
  • Rixa moves her head to her left and down (toward Charlie) while extending her neck toward Charlie.
  • Charlie is panting, has a furrowed brow, is quite close to Ryder, and is in a a cower (not as deep as the previous photo), his tail appears to be tucked (from the position of his rump and prior photos).
Rixa and Ryder, focus on Charlie, not Louise
Rixa and Ryder, focus on Charlie, not Louise
  • Charlie is behind Ryder and is moving away – he is increasing the distance between himself and Ryder
  • Ryder moves his head to his right and slightly down (following Charlie) while doing a tongue flick (his tongue goes in and out very quickly – a self-soothing behavior)
  • Rixa moves her head to the left and up (toward Charlie) and extends her neck toward Charlie.
  • Charlie has a furrowed brow, is quite close to Ryder and continues to cower. His tail appears to be tucked.
Rixa and Ryder, focus on Charlie, not Louise
Rixa and Ryder, focus on Charlie, not Louise
  • Charlie is almost behind Ryder.
  • Ryder moves his head to the left (following Charlie)
  • Rixa moves her head to the left and down (toward Charlie) and extends her neck toward Charlie.
  • Charlie is panting, has a furrowed brow, is quite close to Ry.der and is in a bit of a cower. Cowering: Charlie’s neck and back are level. his tail is tucked
Rixa and Ryder, focus on Charlie, not Louise
Rixa and Ryder, focus on Charlie, not Louise
  • Charlie has passed Ryder.
  • Ryder moves his head to the right slightly (following Charlie)
  • Rixa moves her head to the right (toward Charlie) and tilts her head toward Charlie.
  • Charlie is panting, has a furrowed brow, is quite close to Rixa. Charlie is not cowering at this point. His tail is low medium – at a 45 degree angle. This information indicates that while he is in the caution zone he is transitioning away from caution toward the green zone- Life’s Good (a happy place). My next post will be about the zones – first you need to understand how to read the body language before you can place the animal in a zone.
Charlie walks past Rixa. Who is more concerned – Rixa or Charlie?
  • Charlie is almost past Rixa.
  • Ryder moves his head to the right (following Charlie)
  • Rixa moves her head to the right and down (following Charlie).Did you notice that Charlie is panting, has a furrowed brow, is quite close to Rixa and is not cowering. Compare this photo of Charlie’s head, neck, back and rear to the others and you will see the difference in his body language. You may wonder why is there a difference. Often it is due to more distance between dogs.
Look at steady Rixa and Ryder are sitting - it is beautiful. They are clearly focused on Louise.
Look at steady Rixa and Ryder are sitting – it is beautiful. They are clearly focused on Louise.
  • Charlie has walked out of the photo and away from Rixa and Ryder
  • Rixa’s focus is back on Louise
  • Ryder’s focus is back on Louise

Definitions:
Cower: Head and Neck are level with the back
Tongue Flick: tongue goes in and out very quickly

dog bite prevention

 

We may not always realize why our dog is distracted and is unable to paying attention to us. We may think that our dog should be giving us his or her undivided attention. When our dog is distracted there is often a logical explanation. Our job is to find the reason and help our dog do the job we want him to do. Oh – don’t forget to have fun in the process!

How do we keep track of all of this? It looks so easy when someone else does it so here are a couple of forms to help you get started. If you want to ask questions along the way feel free to post here or on my Facebook page.

A completed form for you to use as a guide when you fill observe your animals

 

 

A chart that explains the questions you need to consider when observing animals. You may not have the answers to each question, but you want to consider each question when you observe your animal.

observation-log_exmpl_revisedobservation-log_information

A practice quide – there aren’t any “right” or “wrong” answers here… just take a few minutes and think about what you observe in the illustrations and which zone your might place the animal in for the scenario you created. You can create multiple scenarios – how does that effect the zone placement? It is fun to see how each scenario influences the zone.observation-log_practice

A blank form for you to use with your own dogs or clients

observation-log_blank

Once you become proficient at observing animals you won’t need the reminders of Head, Body, Rear, etc.

hugs and woofs

Charlie’s Facial Expressions and Unimaginable Joy

Have you ever wondered what it would be like to live with a blind dog? Charlie was only a puppy when I was told that he needed both of his eyes removed. I worried that I wouldn’t know how to read his facial expressions. Trust me, I was worried for no reason! Charlie is one of the most expressive dogs I’ve ever met.

charlie-ncsu-vs-ted-4a

Charlie was at the North Carolina State University in this photo. He was a participant in a research study. After he completed the study I met some of the research team that reviewed the photos from the project. These members of the team were not present during the testing. They told me that he was so happy which made his smile so big that his eyes were shut! I laughed and said “Yup, that’s my Charlie! He shares unimaginable joy everywhere he goes. But, his smile didn’t shut his eyes. His eyes are sewn shut because he eyes were removed due to complications from blindness…” The professor said he learned that after he reviewed the photos of Charlie, but it wasn’t the his first impression of the dog. I find this interesting because it often happens when Charlie meets new people.

char faces-8

Let me introduce you to puppy Charlie. When I learned he was losing his eyes I thought of the Velveteen Rabbit. In case you don’t the story there is a quote that reminds me of Charlie.

velveteen rabbit

Charlie is very Real and incredibly beautiful. He is resilient and doesn’t easily break. He has taught me much over the years. He sees with his heart and soul. When people meet him they know that he sees them even though he has no eyes. It is a wonderful thing.

It took two different procedures to remove both eyes because there were complications after the first procedure. Charlie was a trooper and in this photo he is on the road to recovery after the surgery. You can tell he was a little wary here as the photo portrays one of Charlie’s more serious moments. This serious pup grew up to be very joyful.

Look at his face – my goodness! He is one of the most expressive dogs I know. Well, he is a beagle and isn’t shy about letting you know what he is feeling! In the photo Charlie is about 10 years old and is sharing his unimaginable joy. I am so thankful for his joy.

One of Charlie’s favorite things to do is the “Snoopy Dance!” Yup – up on his back legs … he stands to dance and he smiles a big goofy smile the entire time … it is a sight to behold when a dog with no eyes is dancing on two feet and laughing at the same time. He knows he will earn some sort of fabulous reward for this trick.

Charlie's official Pets At Duke

Charlie’s head tilt … everyone adores the head tilt. This is Charlie’s camera pose. If you say “Charlie, 1-2-3” he will stop, sit (or lay down) and tilt his head. You need to take the photo on 2, but keep counting to 3. Thank you Kristy for teaching Charlie this trick! Charlie was my active Pet Partner for 8 years and had a lot of photos taken during that time. The camera pose trick served us well. This is Charlie’s official Pets At Duke photo – thank you Diane Lewis Photography for this and many other amazing photos!

Don’t be fooled – the boy can get down and dirty. Somehow I think he is part duck because he almost never is muddy. However, one day he came inside so full of mud. He seemed so proud of himself for being so muddy, that I had to document his muddiness! Notice the ears – they are flipped back. I think the flipped back ears help him cool off, but they can also be a sign of arousal…

How did I ever think that a dog with no eyes would have a face that didn’t have expressions? Between his eyebrows, mouth, and ears there is a ton of information! (the flipped back ear in this case is arousal)

Charlies journey-29

After a hard day’s work even Charlie gets tired and needs to go to bed! This photo is from his early years. You can tell he is younger because his face has ticking showing so he was between 1 and 2 years old.

Thanksgiving Dogs-15

One of Charlie’s favorite things – to sit on my lap and help me work. I find this photo fascinating because it is like Charlie is watching himself on the computer… only how can he? The photo demonstrates why people ask me “are you sure he isn’t faking being blind?” I know, the dog has no eyes, nothing connected to his optic nerve and yet people want to know if he is faking it… I’m tempted to ask them “what color is George Washington’s white horse?” Yes, he is blind … he just doesn’t need his eyes to see.

Charlie may be getting older but he doesn’t let that slow him down. He doesn’t let a little thing like the weather slow him down. If there was a thought bubble over his head it might be something like “what, you think a little snow is going to stop me? I’m blind. I might older, but I can still get around… I like snow. Let me play. Stop taking my picture already!” You need a Jersey or maybe Brooklyn accent in there too. And did you notice… head tilt…. what do you think – does he always tilt his head the same direction?

char faces-5

Happiness!! More of Charlie’s unimaginable joy.
We all need unimaginable joy in our lives.

char faces-6

Charlie is on the beach. His head is lifted into the wind, feeling the breeze and smelling all the things that a beagle can smell.  Sheer bliss… He might not be showing unimaginable  joy in the form of the Snoopy Dance or giving you a goofy grin… but this face, this is his bliss face. He loves the beach. I’m not sure if it is because he likes the water (he does) or if it is because he likes the variety of stinky smells! He loves smelling dead fish, all things about birds, people cooking out. You name it he can identify the smells. He can tell you exactly where it is coming from and more importantly where he might snag a tasty treat! If you happen to go to the beach with Charlie – you had better safeguard your burgers!
char faces-13

Charlie with a chin over Ella … Charlie and Ella are best buds and snuggle together all the time. The fact that they are looking in different directions could be that each dog finds different things distracting. This photo was taken on the main traffic circle at Duke on a Sunday morning. There were several cars that kept driving around the traffic circle watching as I took a series of photos which I found distracting. I can only imagine what the dogs thought! Charlie “watched” the cars go round and round!

char-faces-11

Charlie still has the smile… and unimaginable  joy… and can make you feel special just by being near you. I still get requests for visits with him, but he is retired and has earned the right to be a couch potato, prowl for critters in the back yard, open all the kitchen cabinet doors (and climb inside) and howl at strange sounds.

Charlie’s parting thoughts are for you to find your own unimaginable joy. The list below are some of things that are Charlie’s happiness which is why he wants you to know that you should feel free to add whatever it is that makes you feel unimaginable joy.

charlies-wisdom

Dog Days of Summer: Time for A Swim

Where I live, one pool remains open the day after the city pools close for the summer so we take our dogs swimming for the day. It’s the annual “Pooch Plunge” and a ton of fun!

Controlled chaos - everyone was having fun
Controlled chaos – everyone was having fun – from Newfies to Yorkies!

If you have never been to a city pool filled with dogs you need to try it some time – it was an adventure! I loved the fact that everyone was engaged with their animals. Cell phones were only used to take photos! People wanted to share how much fun they were having and how awesome their dogs were!

How many balls can I hold in my mouth while swimming?

The pool gave away tennis ballsand there were plenty to go around. Some dogs made no secret of their desire to have at least two or three balls in their mouth at one time!

Come on in the water is nice
Come on in the water is nice

As one dog was getting ready to jump in another dog was holding on for dear life! The dog in the middle of the pool was uncertain in the water and it took her most of the day to learn that she could swim. I’m not sure who felt a greater sense of accomplishment – the dog or her handlers! Once the dog figured out how to swim on her own she was a swimming machine!

just how deep is the water here?

It sure looks like this dog is trying to decide whether or not to take the plunge! In the meantime she decided a drink was a good idea. Oh so cute.

Did you know a dog can climb a ladder - even when wet?
Did you know a dog can climb a ladder – even when wet?

Did you know that you can teach a dog to get out of the pool using the ladder? Pretty impressive! This dog was in the deep end and showed no hesitation as she climbed up and out of the pool. Her routine was to take a lap, get out, shake off and then jump in again! If this dog isn’t already enrolled in an agility class I hope they get her enrolled soon.

You go first, no you go...
You go first, no you go…

What do you think? Are these dogs using telepathy to move the ball closer so they don’t have to jump in? I wonder if we put a thought bubble over their heads if it would read something like  ” get over here you @#%! ball” or maybe “I’m gonna have to dunk you” or maybe it’s more like “go ahead, stay you where you are, make my day. You know I want to pounce on you and dunk you!” We’ll never know for sure. I enjoyed watching these dogs as they decided how to get the ball that’s for sure!

We're just hanging out on a hot summer day
We’re just hanging out on a hot summer day

Meanwhile at the other end of the pool bunches of dogs and people hang out together.

Newfoundland - swimming with grace
Newfoundland – swimming with grace

You can’t tell how big the dog is from the photo – it is a Newfie – one of the larger dogs at the pool.

I may be little but I'm really, really fast!
I may be little but I’m really, really fast!

And the littlest dog – a Yorkie… it took him about 10 paddles to cover 1 glide of the Newfie’s! Seriously this little dog could swim a thousand miles a minute. He zipped in and out, around and through all the big dogs. He had a heart of gold and wanted to keep up with all the big dogs.

There was a spray station too! This little girl loved dancing in the spray while the dogs ran around her.
There was a spray station too! This little girl loved dancing in the spray while the dogs ran around her.

Dance like no one is watching… I love this picture. It’s hard to see all of the dogs in this photo, but there are at least 4. The spray station was a lot of fun and the dogs loved playing chase games through the “rain” drops! The little girl danced with such joy.

Jade retrieving dummy
Jade retrieving dummy

I couldn’t resist putting in a photo of Jade working in the water. Whether our dogs are swimming for fun or working in the water it is important that we remember whatever we do with our dogs, everyone should enjoy it. Jade would have enjoyed the Pooch Plunge, but I would not have been able to keep an eye on her and help others at the same time – that breaks my rule of take care of your animal first. Don’t worry, Jade gets to go swimming even if she didn’t go to the Pooch Plunge.

What I loved most about the Pooch Plunge was everyone was so happy. The joy people had when their dogs were swimming was evident to everyone present. When their dog learned how to swim they glowed with joy.

My goal in the coming weeks is to find a new trick to teach each of my dogs. I want to find something that brings joy to both my dogs and those around them.  What about you? Will you me and find a new skill that makes you and your dogs happy?

I hope y’all have had a wonderful summer.

Related Links/Stories – with more photos and video
Durham pool goes to the dogs

Dog Days in Durham

Pooch Plunge Closes Out Season